Funny and Weird Mixed English Word

English is a West Germanic languages compose the widely three traditional branches of languages of the Germanic family including  languages such as English, German, Dutch, Afrikaans, the Frisian languages and Yiddish or Jewish of Ashkenazi Jewish origin, spoken in many parts of the world, which was first spoken in early medieval England and is now the world’s most widely used language. English is the first language spoken by the several sovereign states majority’s populations, such as Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom and United States, and some of Caribbean nations. English is the third-most-common native language in the world, after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish, and the second language widely learned and became the official language of the European Union, most of the Commonwealth countries, United Nations and many world organizations. Countries also have millions of native speakers of  of dialect continua (a dialect continuum or dialect area a spoken dialects in a range across some geographical area with a little difference between their neighboring areas) such as the Philippines, Jamaica and Nigeria. Some languageas ranged from an English-based creole (a stable natural language developed from mixed of parent languages called creole language, or simply a creole). Creoles differ from pidgin language, a simplified language developed as a means of communication between two or more groups that do not have a language in common) such as standard version of English language. India is one of those nations where their second language is English, and have the most such speakers and speak commonly in Indian English. India now has more English speakers population, who speak or understand English than any other country in the world, with combined native and English language. Most of these mixed languages combined with English sometimes sounds funny and weird for those English speaking countries.

Guadeloupe creole language

Guadeloupe creole language

creole language example is the road sign in Guadeloupe Creole which means Slow down. Children are playing here, while literally, the translation is Lift your foot. There are small people playing here.

1) Singlish – Singapore-English

Many signs in Singapore include all four official languages: English, Chinese, Tamil and Malay.

Many signs in Singapore include all four official languages: English, Chinese, Tamil and Malay.

Singlish Lah (La) being used on an advertising board outside a cafe in Pulau Ubin.

Singlish Lah (La) being used on an advertising board outside a cafe in Pulau Ubin.

Singlish is the English-based creole or patois spoken colloquially in Singapore, also called Singapore-English, although English is the dominant language in Singapore. Singlish has its unique slang and combined words to form phrases, clauses, and sentences, which is spoken and pronounced in informal speech. Singlish is commonly spoken in a mixture of English, Mandarin, Tamil, Malay, and some local dialects like Hokkien, Cantonese or Teochew. One example of Singlish, where a counter staff in a restaurant or fastfood center, asked his  costumer, if the order is to be eaten inside the restaurant or have to take out his order: Customer ordered a chicken rice, then the counter staff asked: Sir, having here or you want to take away or tah-bao? Another example of Singlish is Don’t play play! literally means Don’t fool around or Better take things seriously. Issit/Izzit? – Abbreviated form of is it? used as a standard tag question in Singlish they say Issit or Izzit, example: You going home now issit? or  You not going home issit? Also if someone comments: You look good today, and reply: Issit? Another example of Singlish; English: Why are you like that? Singlish: Why you so liddat ar? (a question made to someone who is being unreasonable). In Singapore, the English language is a sociolect continuum. The continuum covers through the following language  varieties, such as Acrolectal Singaporean English showing an absence of or a much smaller degree of Singlish pronunciation featuring more  than Maesolectal, a combined Standard English and Singlish language and Basilectal, and pidgin variants of Singlish, with some features not found in other forms of English begin to emerge. Basilectal is the colloquial speech literally referred to as Singlish for informal settings, one can find all of the unique phonological, lexical, and grammatical Singlish features, which some of these features can be attributed to Asian languages such as the Chinese languages,Native Malay, or Tamil an Indian languages, though some cannot. Basilect (Singlish) – Dis guy Singrish si beh zai sia. Mesolect – Dis guy Singlish damn good eh. Acrolect (Standard Singlish) – This person’s Singlish is very good.

2) Manglish or Malaysian English

Manglish (image credit:www.parenbonjour.com)

Manglish (image credit:www.parenbonjour.com)

Bahasa Rojak (Manglish)

Bahasa Rojak (Manglish)

Manglish or Malglish or Mangled English, is an English-based creole language spoken in Malaysia, which most of the Manglish vocabulary consists of words from English, Malay, Hokkien, Mandarin, Cantonese, Tamil origins, and to some of the European languages, while Manglish words combined to form phrases, grammar, and sentences resembles southern Chinese language varieties. Manglish or Malaysian English is sometimes known as Rojak or Bahasa Rojak (mixed language in Malay) but it is not the same from the Rojak language by the English usage as the basic language. The Manglish of the  East Coast versions (Kelantan and Terengganu) may be differ, as their Malay accent and weird to a particular trade, profession, or group are particularly alien to regular West Malaysian from the West Coast speakers, which is often similar to Singlish. An example of Manglish words and grammar: the word kapster – a nosy or talkative person (I hate them because they are so kapster). The Malay verb contraction”cakap“, or to speak, plus- ster, may be from analogy with English words such as trickster, or stamp – chop which is derived from Malay word cop which means stamp an example: Put your company chop on the receipt, or from a Malay word kakau meaning to disturb: Please don’t kacau me. “Izzit?” – Expression of mild unbelief from the word, “Is that so?” in Manglish Izzit? The word Lah is often used with brusque, short, negative responses, for example; Don’t have, lah! Also a abrupt and short response to, Lend me some money, can? or Don’t worry, he can do it one lah, or sometimes as Dun worry, he can get it done or if declined answered as No lah!. Can and what is used extensively as both a question particle and an answer particle. The negative is cannot as Gimme lah, ok or not? (Give it to me, OK?); Sure! Can! or Sure!, Cannot. (No way).  The Manglish difference to Singlish is the use of colloquialism or expressions commonly used for the location. The Manglish word is influenced more by Malay language while in Singlish is influenced by Hokkien or Mandarin accent and words in it. Malay is an important language in Malaysia and the influence of it in Manglish is undeniable. Manglish words example, uses like kena, and many more, while Singlish uses words like liao, or nia. The influences of Manglish and Singlish with each other are great and it is hard to differentiate by foreigner.

3) Tinglish or Thai-English

Tinglish or Thai-English

Tinglish or Thai-English

Thaiglish or Tinglish (image credit:travelwithashley.com)

Thaiglish or Tinglish (image credit:travelwithashley.com)

Tinglish, an American English and Thailand also called Thaiglish (in UK English) sometimes called Thenglish, Thailish or Thainglish is the English form with wrong grammar, produced by native Thai speakers because of language interference from the original language, with differences from ‘native’ English with different pronunciation, unusual choice of word, and grammatical error, as well as innovative vocabulary items, omitting of pronouns and the verb be, using present tense like already instead using past tense, non-use or incorrect use of articles, declension (inflection of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and articles to indicate number such as singular and plural) and conjugation (the inflection of verbs) addition of Thai final particles, example: I don’t know na. The confusion between any and every, and the lallation ((also called cambia-letras or troca-letraletter changer, in Latin American countries) is an imperfect pronunciation of the letter L in which it sounded like R, found frequently in infantile speech or like baby talk) of the H and S pronunciation, TH sound pronounced as the two letters, not as th in English, using N to replace an L sound at the end of the word, example: particle pronounced particon or football pronounced futbon. Putting S on singular verbs to the subject, example: “He’s talk too much” instead of saying He talks too much. Direct translation examples: such as same same (similar, as usual) and same same but different (seems similar but different in some ways), I li’ you welly welly mutt (I like you very much), My frien’ you (You are my friend), Him boxing you (He will punch you), Up to you (It’s your decision), open or close the light (means “To turn on/off the light”), no have or I no have (means there is no or I do not have),  I send you to airport (means “I will take you to the airport”), I very like it (means “I really like it”), I’m sad when my mother angry me (means is angry with me), I telephone for you ­(I called you) and Run me nut (means”drive me nuts”).

4) Hinglish or Hindi-English

Hinglish  (image credit:www.ibtimes.com)

Hinglish (image credit:www.ibtimes.com)

Hingrish warning notice for tourists of India (image credit:www.womentravelmotherindia.com)

Hingrish warning notice for tourists of India (image credit:www.womentravelmotherindia.com)

Hinglish is a portmanteau of Hindi and English, is a macaronic language, an English hybrid words and South Asian languages, a code-switching of variety languages where they are interchanged freely within a sentence. While the name is based on the Hindi language, it does not refer exclusively to Hindi, but is commonly used in India, combined with English words blending with Punjabi and Hindi words within British Asian families speaking standard English. Some examples of Hinglish vocabulary are: airdash (going somewhere in a hurry), stadium (a bald man with a fringe of hair), pre-pone is the opposite of postpone, (to bring something forward in time), co-brother (brother-in-law), Eve teasing (street sexual harassment), glassy (wanting a drink), timepass (a distraction to pass the time), badmash (hooligan). Hinglish is very common used in Hindi speaking states of India’s urban and semi-urban centers, but gradually spreading into rural and remote areas of these states through media, television, mobile phones and word of mouth, slowly achieving vernacular (native language or native dialect) status. A trend of Hinglish pop songs was popularized by DJ Aqeel in 2003, with his successful song, Tu Hai Wohi became popular, followed by popular Hinglish songs by Harry Anand like Chadti Jawani Meri Chaal Mastani which samples the The Ketchup Song and Kaanta Laga by DJ Doll. Hinglish has been effectively used in Indian advertising over the past years in advertising slogans, like the 1998 Pepsi slogan Yeh Dil Maange More! (This heart desires more!), Yehi hai right choice, Baby (This is the Right Choice, Baby) or Yeh Hai Youngistaan. Hinglish is also the way English is pronounced by Hindi speaking people, example of Hinglish, juoloji for zoology, pphunny for funny, pphor for four, for zoo is joo in Hinglish, iskool for school, ispade for spade and other twin consonants that begin with the letter s at the beginning of a word, iskander for Alexander.

Indian English

Indian-English (image credit:www.maxlolz.com)

Indian-English (image credit:www.maxlolz.com)

South Indian-English (image credit:www.jokeroo.com)

South Indian-English (image credit:www.jokeroo.com)

Indian English is the English dialect group spoken primarily in the Indian subcontinent is a southern region of Asia, located mostly on the Indian Plate projecting southward into the Indian Ocean, including the core lands of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The official language of India is English and is widely spoken used in literary contexts. After the 1947’s Indian Independence from the British colonial rule, there were attempts to introduce Hindi as the national language of India, but due to wide protests from the Tamil Nadu and other states that are non-Hindi-speaking, it was decided to temporarily retain English for official purposes until a resolution could be passed regarding the national official language. Thus, Indian English was commonly used in India, where there are unique usages and oftentimes sounds funny for other English speaking countries, that do not derive from British English. Examples of Indian English words; acting pricey -playing hard to get, or being snobbish, break-up = breakdown ( example of salary), bunk a class = to skip class without permission ( still common in British English), bus stand = bus station, bus stop, carrying = pregnant, chargesheet = formal charges filed in a court, to file charges against someone in court, clean chit = acquittal from an accusation, club = to merge or put two things together (as, Just club it together),  crib = to complain, expire = to die, especially referring to a family member, hill station = mountain resort, loose motionDiarrhea or diarrhoea,
shift = to relocate (example, He shifted from Jaipur to Gurgaon), Where are you put up? = ‘Where are you currently staying? goggles = sunglasses, while in southern India, specifically Kerala, India it refers to as cooling glass and paining = means  hurting, (My head is paining).

5)   Englog or Taglish (Tagalog-English)

Taglish jokes (image credit:doblelol.com)

Taglish jokes (image credit:doblelol.com)

jejemon texting (image credit:article.wn.com)

jejemon texting (image credit:article.wn.com)

Englog, sometimes Enggalog, is an informal Tagalog English sociolect in the Philippines, which the term is a pormanteau of the English and Tagalog words, which is formed by infusing Tagalog words and structures into English, an example of which is called Konyo English. Somewhat relative to this is Taglish, which in turn is Tagalog infused with English words and structures, and a pormanteau of the words English and Tagalog, referring to the Philippine language or its liberalized official form, Filipino language, infused with American English words, which is an example of code-switching. Another pop culture phenomenon that went viral in the Philippines is the weird language known as Jejemon. A Jejemon is a person who has managed to destroy the English language to the point of difficult to understand, according to the Urban Dictionary. The jejemon origins of short-handed typing commonly used in the short messaging service (SMS), in which each text message sent via a cellphone is limited to 160 characters. In order to fit the 160 character limit, an SMS language developed where the words were shortened, however, some jejemons are not really minimizing the characters, instead, their text message becomes very long consuming the 160 character limits. Such short-handed language or jejemons is not limited to Filipinos, also the Thais use 5555 to denote laughter, hahahaha, since in Thai language the number 5 is pronounced as “ha.” Some examples of Filipino jejemons in a text message;  “3ow ph0w, mUsZtAh nA?” translated into Filipino as “Hello po, kumusta na?, translated into English as “Hello, how are you?”. Another examples are; aQ / aQcKuHh – means in English, me and Tagalog, ako”, kEo means in Tagalog-kayo or English-you, uZtaH? – means “kumusta/how are you?” jAjaJa or jeJejE, garbled words conveying laughter or conveys sly laughter. The Jejemons are said to be the new jologs, a term used for Filipinos of the lower income class. Taglish is used by many Filipinos living abroad ( native speakers of Tagalog or non-native speakers who studied Tagalog in the Philippines or elsewhere), such as in countries like Australia, where English is a lingua franca and other countries such as Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, the United States and the United Kingdom. Taglish is commonly used by many Filipinos in SMS messages to write the messages more quickly.

6)  Jamaican English

English to Patwa or Jamaican Patois (image credit:fiverr.com)

English to Patwa or Jamaican Patois (image credit:fiverr.com)

 English Jamaican accent (image credit:www.thumbwizards.com)

English Jamaican accent (image credit:www.thumbwizards.com)

Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a variety of the English spoken in Jamaica, and can be seen as parts of both American English and British English dialects, with many characteristics of intonation of an Irish language, and uses the same spellings found in British English. The diferrence between the British English and the Jamaican English, is described as a continuum rather than a solid line, and should not be confused with Jamaican Patois, known locally as Patois (Patwa or Patwah) or Jamaican, and called Jamaican Creole by linguists, as English- lexified creole language or English-based creole language with influences of West African spoken primarily in Jamaica and the Jamaican diaspora. Jamaican Patois is not to be confused with Jamaican English, or with the Rastafarian use of English (Iyaric also referred to as Wordsound, Livalect, Dread-talk or I-talk is a created English dialect in use among the Rastafari movement members). The pronunciation  and vocabulary of Jamaican language are significantly different from English, despite heavy use of English words or adapted words. The Jamaican Patois have similarities to the West African’s pidgin and creole, due to their common descent from the blending of African substrate language (or in scientific study of language, a stratum or strate is a language that influences, or influenced by another language through communications) with European languages. Jamaican-speaking communities exist among Jamaican expatriates in Miami Florida, New York City, Toronto, Hartford, Washington D.C., Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico and the Caribbean coast in Panama, also in the United Kingdom such as London, Birmingham, Manchester and Nottingham. The Jamaican English variety, are easy to understand commonly used in San Andrés y Providencia Islands, Colombia, which was introduced by the Jamaican Maroons descendants (escaped slaves in the 18th century, using Mesolectal forms which is similar to very basilectal Belizian Kriol). Jamaican Patois is the most spoken language, which is the most prestigious (mostly Creole) variety known as the basilect ,the acrolect the Standard or high prestige variety and mseolects the in-between versions. Some Jamaican English example, in the following forms: im ah wok oba deh suh (basilect), im workin ova deh suh (low mesolect), he is workin ove’ der (high mesolect) and He is working over there (acrolect). Note the word ‘over’, the letter r is not pronounced in any variety, but in the word “dere” or “there”the r is emphasized). While in mixed British and American vocabulary  as in automobiles, where the American term for trunk is almost widely used instead of the British term boot, while in the British term for the engine covering is always referred to as bonnet, and in American English term is hood, which is used in Jamaica as a vulgar slang for penis. The Jamaican Standard also uses variant local words borrowed from Jamaican Patois, such as duppy which means ghost (Duppy is a Jamaican Patois word of Northwest African origin meaning spirit or ghost), higgler an informal word for vendor or hawker, and some terms for local foods, like ackee, also known as achee, akee apple or akee (Blighia sapida), Callaloo (sometimes calaloo or kallaloo) is a popular Caribbean dish originating in West Africa which is served in variants styles across the Caribbean, which is the main ingredient is a leaf vegetable), guinep or Spanish lime , and the traditional Jamaican cassava called  Bammy or bami. Examples of Jamaican Patois; I or me – mi, you- ju (singular) unu (plural), he or him, she or her –im (no gender selection), we, us and our- wi, they, them, their- dem. A batty boy (also spelled batty bwoy, other terms include batty man and chi chi boy or man) is a gay, bisexual or effeminate in Jamaican culture and term coming from Jamaican Patois.

7)   Guyanese Creole

creole language to English (image credit: christophelandry.com)

creole language to English (image credit: christophelandry.com)

Guyanese Creole is an English-based creole language with African and East Indian phrases or sentences spoken widely by Guyana people, with its influences from Dutch, West African languages, Arawakan and Caribbean languages (such as Jamaican Patwa, and Haitian Creole) and a little influences by Indian languages, and is related to Paramaccan (an ethnic group living in the forested interior of Suriname, is also the same name for their language, which is English-based with Portuguese language influences other languages) Kwinti and Aluku. Example of Guyanese creole English base: I will do it- a go do it, He had the gun- i bin get i gon, they usually want to take money from you- dem a waan sting yu waan bil, It would have taken us a little time but we should have come out all right- i wuda tek awi lil taim but awi bin go kom out seef. In Guyana, the official language used is English, which is the only South American country with English as the official language.

South African English

African English (image credit:www.reed.edu)

African English (image credit:www.reed.edu)

South African English (SAfrE, SAfrEng, SAE, en-ZA), is the English variant dialects spoken by South Africans, originating from he Dutch language, with the first language English varieties spoken by Zimbabweans, Zambians and Namibians, being recognised as growing language. There is some social and regional variation within South African English, with the social variation within white South African English has been classified into three groups named by Roger Lass as”The Great Trichotomy”, Cultivated, closely approximates Receive pronunciation associated with upper class; General, a social indicator of the middle class, and Broad, associated with the working class, and closely approximates the second-language Afrikaans-English variety, which has similarity to the case in Australian English. The same with the British English in Southern England, South African English is non-rhotic accents are spoken to exclude the sound r from the syllable coda before a consonant or intonation phrase. This is commonly sometimes misleading referred to as post-vocalic R. In traditional language terms, (except for some Afrikaans-influenced speakers), featuring the trap–bath split,vowel split occurring mainly in southern varieties of English English or English language in England. There are words that do not exist in British or American English, commonly derived from African languages such as Afrikaans or Zulu, though there is an influence from the Indian language particularly in Durban, and slang developed by subcultures, particularly surfers. Variant terms in common with North American English, such as Mom, (Mum is used in most British and Australian English) freeway‘ or ‘highway‘ (British English ‘motorway‘), cellphone (British and Australian English, mobile) and buck meaning money (rand for currency term and not a dollar). One of the South African English speakers most noticeable traits of South African is the tendency to use the Afrikaans ‘ja‘ for yes, while in any situation where other English-speakers would say yes, yeah, ya or well. South Africans are also known for their irregular use of the word now, particularly just now, is used to mean later or in a while or a few hours’ time, rather than saying, this very minute’, while South African would say ‘right now‘ and now now’ is relatively more immediate, implying a delay of a few minutes to around half an hour. The word ‘just’ in British English when applied to location, and such expressions ‘just there’, or ‘just around the corner’ are accepted to imply a precise point. Some words unique to South African English such as for American English sneaker in South African English- takkies, tackie or tekkie, or trainers, in British English a small van similar to Volkswagen Kombi it is called combi or kombi, ‘bakkie’ for a pick-up truck, kiff for pleasurable, nice -is lekker donga for gully (a small ravine or cliff), dagga for cannabis, for barbecue- braai and jol for party. The braai is Afrikaans for barbecue or grill, and is a social custom in South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Lesotho, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Zambia, which the term originated with the Afrikaans-speaking people. In Afrikaans the word meat is vleis. Most of Afrikaans languages adopted words from languages such as Malay, Portuguese, the Bantu languages, technically the Narrow Bantu languages, constitute a traditional sub-branch of the Niger-Congo languages and the Khoisan languages (also Khoesan or Khoesaan) are the languages of Africa an estimated 90 to 95 percent of Afrikaans vocabulary is ultimately of Dutch origin. Examples of Afrikaans, Ek het nie geweet dat hy sou kom nie. (Dutch) Ik wist niet dat hij zou komen, in English it means- I knew not that he would come, (Afrikaans) Dis (Dit is) nie so moeilik om Afrikaans te leer nie, (Dutch)Het is niet zo moeilijk om Afrikaans te leren, (English) It is not so difficult to learn Afrikaans,( Afrikaans) het (Dutch) heb, hebt, heeft, hebben (English) has and have, (Afrikaans) die (Dutch) de, het (English) the, (Afrikaans)dit (Dutch) het (English) it.

8) Chinglish or Chinese-English

Chinglish or Chinese-English signs- No soliciting and whoring prostitutes

Chinglish or Chinese-English signs- No soliciting and whoring prostitutes

Steek-form of Chinglish uses obscure English terms, namely, Scottish English steek "enclose; close; shut" instead of the common word.

Steek-form of Chinglish uses obscure English terms, namely, Scottish English steek “enclose; close; shut” instead of the common word.

Chinglish Go Straight On Public-Go straight on public is a mistranslation of "Public washroom outside on the second floor.

Chinglish Go Straight On Public-Go straight on public is a mistranslation of “Public washroom outside on the second floor.

Chinglish sometimes spelled as Chingrish referring to English language spoken or written, influenced by the Chinese language. The  Chinglish term is commonly used to ungrammatical or nonsensical English in Chinese contexts, and may have pejorative or depreciates sign system on a message. Other words used to characterized the phenomenon are the Chinese English, China English and Sinicized  English. Chinglish is the English word a portmanteau of Chinese and English. The literal Chinese style English and the Chinese equivalent is Zhōngshì Yīngyǔ. Examples of Chinglish or Chingrish: Do not want is a mistranslation of zha guanchang  on a menu, No, Fried enema, fried sausage with flour stuffed into hog casings confused the cooking and medical meanings of guanchang as to make a sausage and (give) an enema (the procedure of inserting enema tube with liquids into the rectum and colon via the anus to induce vowel movement).

Hong Kong English

English Chinese (image credit:doubledt.com)

English Chinese (image credit:doubledt.com)

Chinese English (image credit:gallery.asiantown.net)

Chinese English (image credit:gallery.asiantown.net)

Hong Kong English may refer to two different concepts, with the first concept referring to the variant dialect of the English language used in Hong Kong, while the second concept referring to the Cantonese speaker’s accent and elements. Cantonese is the de facto official language of Hong Kong, a Chinese language originating from Guangdong province to the north of Hong Kong. According to a census report in 1996, English is the official language in Hong Kong , and spoken by 3.1 percent of the population as an everyday language and as a second language by 34.9 percent of the population. Billboard Signs displayed both in Chinese and English are common throughout the Hong Kong  territory. An increase in immigrants from mainland China and greater integration with the mainland economy have brought an increasing number of Mandarin speakers to Hong Kong since the 1997’s handover. The Cantonese English, in theory, refers to the English accent and characteristics spoken by native Hong Kong nationals and other Cantonese speakers, and primarily spoken by those whose first language is Cantonese language. Although it is called as Hong Kong English, it is not only spoken in Hong Kong, but also people who come from Canton now known as Guanzhou, who come from Cantonese-speaking regions. Chinglish is often considered, especially by the locals in Hong Kong as the variant Chinglish in Hong Kong variant. The majority of Hong Kong locals with English proficiency that tend to be influenced by British English and American English or combined of both English language.

9)  Engrish or Japanese English

Engrish Notice in Saesebo, Japan

Engrish Notice in Saesebo, Japan

Engrish bathroom notice (image credit:youoffendmeyouoffendmyfamily.com)

Engrish bathroom notice (image credit:youoffendmeyouoffendmyfamily.com)

Engrish notice (image credit:Engrishfunny.com/www.atheistnexus.org)

Engrish notice (image credit:Engrishfunny.com/www.atheistnexus.org)

Engrish is a slang term for English language, misuse by native speakers of some East Asian languages which the term itself relates to Japanese speakers with tendency to unintentional substitute the English phonemes R and L for one another, because the Japanese language  has one alveolar consonants in place for both r and l letters. The related term wasei-eigo referring to Pseudo-anglicisms (are English  words which were borrowed from English but are used in a native English way native speakers sometimes hard to recognize or understand) that have used into Japanese English. A lallation (also called cambia-letras or troca-letra,  or letter changer, in Latin America countries) an imperfect enunciation of the letter L, in which it sounds like R, as frequently found in infantile speech similar to “baby talk”. The pattern of  speech has been associated with the use of the English, Portuguese and Spanish by Chinese, Korean and Japanese people. The use of lallation has been a common mixed English languages of Western stereotypes or ethnic stereotypes of Asian people. Engrish in Japan are commonly found in many places, such as signs, menus, and advertisements. The Japanese English terms such as Japanglish, Japlish or Janglish for Japan, Korean English or Konglish for Korea, and Chinese English or Chinglish for China are more specific terms for Engrish. Wasei-eigo a Japanese-English words formed, coined in Japan, are Japanese English words, constructions not used in the Englsih speaking world or by native English speakers, but is common used in Japanese English or Engrish. This term should not be confused with gairaigo, referring to modern borrowing from English words proper into Japanese. Wasei-eigo is also distinct from Engrish, due to actual Japanese words used in Japanese conversation, not an attempt at speaking English. Some Engrishexamples are sararīman in English;  Salaryman  meaning  white-collar worker, or oeru – English; office lady, often abbreviated OL, meaning ‘female office worker’; raito noberu or light novel in English. One famous Engrish (Japanese broken English) phrase example in pop culture is the video game Zero Wing translation which gave birth to the phenomenon All your base are belong to us” (often shortened to “All Your Base“, “AYBABTU“, or simply “AYB“) that became an Internet phenomenon or meme. 

10)  Konglish – Korean English

Konglish- Korean English (image credit:asiasociety.org)

Konglish- Korean English (image credit:asiasociety.org)

Konglish notice (image credit:supernoona.com)

Konglish notice (image credit:supernoona.com)

Konglish is a Korean English style, using English words and mixed with Korean context. The English words, initially been taken from the English language, combined in Korean context, such as motorcycle, a combination of Korean and English words, or Officetel or Office + Hotel which are not used in English speaking countries. Konglish can be considered a sublanguage, and a structure of common sentence or vocabulary mistakes made by Koreans referred to as Konglish. When Koreans feel that the language used is long, the words and phrases borrowed from English or other languages may be shortened. When Koreans emigrate to countries that are English speaking, thus Konglish is develop and refer to Korean words being used in mainly English sentences. Examples of Konglish; geim (Hangeul)- game English, nektai (Hangeul)-necktie (English), noteu (Hangeul)- note (English), dalleo (Hangeul)-dollar (English), menyu (Hangeul)-menu (English), reosia (Hangeul)- Russia (English), miteo (Hangeul)- meter (English), beoseu (Hangeul)-bus (English), syawo (Hangeul)-shower (English), syoping (Hangeul)-shopping (English), syupeomaket (Hangeul)-supermarket (English), seuteureseu (Hangeul) stress (English), aiseukeurim (Hangeul) ice cream (English), apateu (Hangeul) apartment (English), orenji (hangeul) orange (English), keopi (Hangeul) coffee (English), hwaiting (Hangeul) fighting (English) and many more.

11)  CzenglishCzech English

Czenglish

Czenglish

Czenglish, is a portmanteau of the words Czech and English, a structure of poor or broken English spoken by native Czech speakers. Examples include confusing copied word for word translations such as “basic school” for “základní škola“, which should be “primary school” or “elementary school”, incorrect word order in a sentence and use of inappropriate prepositions and conjunctions because of the influence of their Czech language equivalents. There are some Czenglish elements only cause a little confusion and are eventually understood by a native Czech speaker. However, for other people it may lead to more embarrassing situations, since a native English speaker seem to say it in correct English sentences, although the Czech speaker meant to say something different or misinterpret. Example of Czenglish: A Czech girl was working in United Kingdom, in a pub as a waitress, when the pub owner asked her if she could work overtime for more longer hours. The waitress replied, Only if you get down on your knees and please me.Then the confusion here arises from the Czech word prosím, which is most commonly an idiom which translates as please,but is literally part of the verb prosit which means to beg.

12)  Denglisch – German English

Denglish- Mixed German and English

Denglish- Mixed German and English

Denglisch (image credit:www.deutschthemen.de)

Denglisch (image credit:www.deutschthemen.de)

Denglisch German spelling or Denglish (English spelling) is a portmanteau or a combination of two (or more) words or morphemes, and their definitions, into one new word of the German words Deutsch and Englisch (English). The  Denglisch term is used in all German-speaking countries to refer to the increasingly strong English introductions or pseudo-vocabulary into German. Many synonyms exist, including Germ(l)ish, Gerglish, Angleutsch, and Engleutsch. German pseudo-anglicisms are words that seem to be English words, but they are created by German and have a different meaning, or no meaning at all, in real English. English words that exists or expressions that came to be used in unfamiliar words in German language such as : Handy-in English, mobile phone or cell phone, Denglisch- centre, downtown, central business district in English -City, Smoking in English while in Denglisch is dinner suit, tuxedo, trampen in Denglisch, while in English it is hitchhiking, Sprayer in English while in Denglisch it is called graffiti artist or tagger. Origin: verb sprayen -using a spray can, Dressman– male model, but nowadays in the fashion industry they call them as models.

13)  Dunglish – Dutch English

Dunglish

Dunglish

Dunglish (image creditwww.thailandblog.nl)

Dunglish (image creditwww.thailandblog.nl)

Dunglish is a combination of two words of Dutch and English or Dutch English, is the English errors by native Dutch speakers make when speaking English. The Dunglish or Dutch-English are closely related Germanic languages. Learning English language in the Netherlands starts in elementary school or secondary school, and Dutch-speaking Belgians are taught and learned English from the age of twelve. All foreign-language movies, or English-spoken movies are subtitled instead of being dubbed in the Netherlands and in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium. Errors or mistakes often occur because of the false friend (pairs of words or phrases in two languages or dialects (or letters in two alphabets  that look or sound the same, but different in meaning) or the false cognate (pairs of words in the same or different languages with the same form and meaning but have different roots) possibility, incorrect words translated for understandable reasons. Example of Dutch English or Dunglish errors: The Former Prime Minister of the Netherlands Pieter Sjoerds Gerbrandy, had a meeting with former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (from 1940 to 1945) in London. When Gerbrandy entered the room and shook Churchill’s hand, saying: Goodbye! Churchill responded: This is the shortest meeting I have ever had. Gerbrandy had looked up the English translation of goedendag, which in Dutch can be both used as a greeting and a valediction or complimentary close in American English, as an expression used to say farewell, especially a word or phrase used to end a message. During the World War II Prime Minister Churchill said to former prime-minister Gerbrandy, while the two were standing on a balcony: Spring is in the air, Gerbrand replied: Why should I? Gerbrandy misunderstood and thought Churchill said to him: Spring ‘ns in de lucht, in English translations as jump into the air. One of the best Dunglish quoted examples was reported to have taken place between the Dutch foreign minister Joseph Luns (which his main foreign language was French, the language of diplomacy before the World War II) and the late U.S. President John F. Kennedy, where he asked Luns if he had any hobbies, to which Luns replied I fok horses , which in the Dutch verb fokken means breeding.  John F. Kennedy, was amused by this strangely obscene reply, Kennedy asked Pardon?, which Luns then mistook as the Dutch word for horses is paarden and with in an enthusiastic manner replied Yes, paarden!

14) Franglais – French English

Franglais- Enseignes La Rochelle

Franglais- Enseignes La Rochelle

Franglais ski notice (image credit:www.guy-sports.com)

Franglais ski notice (image credit:www.guy-sports.com)

Franglais is a combined French (français) and English (anglais) words produced for humorous effect with poor English knowledge. Franglais commonly consists of filling in the gaps with French words and English words, using pairs of two languages and dialects with their incorrect speaking French meaning in such a manner that would be difficult to understand to a French-speaker who does not also have a knowledge of English for example, by using English idiomatic phrases translation. Some Franglais examples are: Longtemps, pas voir. – Long time, no see, Je suis tired– I am tired or (Je suis fatigué), J’agree– I agree, Je vais driver downtown – I’m going to drive downtown.  Franglais in French, refers to the use of English words sometimes regarded as unwelcome imports or as bad slang. Franglais the incorrect usage by second language speakers, which is common across Canada. An anglicism example turned Franglais as the unintentional translation of English phrases into French by students unaware of the Canadian French term, an example, a hot dog is sometimes called un chien chaud which in the French term is as simple as un hot dog.

15) Serblish-Serbian English

Serblish (Serbian English) (image credit:www.ebritic.com)

Serblish (Serbian English) (image credit:www.ebritic.com)

Serblish or Anglo-Serbian, is a combination of two words of  Serbian and English, combining both, in one sentence. This is more commonly seen in the Serbian diaspora (is the Serbs people, formerly constitutional peoples such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Montenegro of either voluntary departure, coercion or force migration or expulsions to other countries, that have occurred throughout history), but can also be noticed in Serbian-speaking countries. Several Serbian speakers do not realize that they are mixing English words into Serbian sentences or Serbian words into English sentences. Serblish is widely used in Australia by Serbian diaspora, and some example of words from English used in Serblish are: Holidej (Holiday), juzati (to use), bjutiful (beautiful), spikerz (speakers), apl-dјus (Apple Juice), barbikju (barbieque), kompjuter (computer), peјntati (to paint), endžojati (to enjoy), čiketina (mix of piletina and chicken) kara -car, aksidant – accident, and many more.

16)  Spanglish- Spanish English

Spanglish Madrid Baidefeis

Spanglish Madrid Baidefeis

Spanglish, Espanglish, Espangles (image credit:webredesignmiami.com)

Spanglish, Espanglish, Espangles (image credit:webredesignmiami.com)

Spanglish is a Latin-Germanic American language developed by the blend of Spanish and English in different levels, of people who speak parts of two languages, or whose native language is different from that of the country where they live. The Spanglish literature term was first introduced  by the Puerto Rican Salvador Tió y Montes De Oca in the late 1940s, where he coined the espanglish term, which later evolved to its current form, the Spanglish. This was his response to the many Spanish-speaking people who immediately renounce their mother tongue in order to learn English upon immigrating to non-Hispanic countries. Spanglish is not an actual language, in spite of widespread used by Hispanic population. Linguists commonly refer to a phenomenon like Spanglish as a pidgin language, which is a language based on a simplified pair of words or phrases and grammar that acts as an intermediary between people who don’t have a common language. In the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Spanglish is very common and widely used language as the United States Army and the early colonial administration who tried to impose and speak English language among the island residents. Some examples of Spanglish by changing some words to English: Te veo ahorita, me voy de shopping para el mall, “See you later, I’m going shopping in the mall”. Spanglish phrases use shorter words often from English Spanish languages as in: Me voy a wake up (instead of: Me voy a levantar or English term- I am going to wake up. Spanglish usage for lunch, is lonche, as in hora del lonche (lunchtime), which is the correct Spanish term is almuerzo. The lunch box is lonchera. Sometimes the term lonche is used to name a sandwich. Some Hispanic term for English term market is marketa which is a frequently used such as in Supermarket,  instead of the word mercado, the standard Spanish word.

17)  Runglish- Russian English

Runglish (image credit:bananet.ru)

Runglish (image credit:bananet.ru)

Runglish, Ringlish, Ruglish or Russlish is a macaronic language of Russian–English, and the term Runglish was popularized in 2000 by Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalyov, who was aboard the International Space Station when he said; “We say jokingly that we communicate in ‘Runglish,’ a mixture of Russian and English languages, so that when we are short of words in one language we can use the other, because all the crew members speak both languages well.” Since then, NASA begun listing Runglish as one of the on-board languages. Although Runglish has less widely used than other pidegins and creoles, such as Tok Pisin (is a creole language spoken throughout Papua New Guinea). Runglish is spoken in numerous English-Russian communities, mostly the Russian-speaking community of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn, New York. In 2007, the Russian government declared to be the “Year of the Russian Language”and claimed that this was in part to give support to what is seen as proper Russian against such influences as the wide spread of English and Runglish languages. However, the head of the Russian State Institute of Foreign Languages, Yuri Prokhorov, stated that “young people always develop fashionable ways of communicating. (But) it is Russian words used incorrectly that damages the purity of the language, not the introduction of foreign words.” Example of Runglish: Appointments- appointmyenti, Iced Coffee- Aysd kofe, Would you like that sliced or in one piece?- Vam naslaysovat’ ili pisom? Driving upstate on the highways- Draivuyem v apsteit po haiveyam, Sliced Cheese- Slaysaushiy chiz.

18) Heblish – Hebrew English

Heblish or Hebrew English (image credit:www.homeschoolhorizons.ca)

Heblish or Hebrew English (image credit:www.homeschoolhorizons.ca)

Heblish (image credit:www.free-hebrew.com)

Heblish (image credit:www.free-hebrew.com)

Heblish, sometimes called Hebglish a combination of two words or phrases from Hebrew and English, is a slang term for a a dynamic linguistic system or interlanguage and referring to the phenomenon of code-switching between the two languages. This may be as a result of poor knowledge of one language or the other or both, or may be usage forming a humorous effect. The Hebraization of English (or Hebraicization) is the use of the Hebrew alphabet to write English. Because Hebrew uses an abjad, a type of writing system, and it can render English words in multiple ways. There are many uses for hebraization, serving as a useful tool for Israeli to learn English language by indicating the pronunciation of unfamiliar letters.

19)  Swenglish -Sweden English

Swenglish (image credit:swenglishbar.com)

Swenglish (image credit:swenglishbar.com)

Swenglish the English language spoken with a heavy Swedish accent  . The English language spoken or written heavily influenced by Swedish vocabulary, grammar or syntax, the study of the principles and processes by which sentences are formed in particular languages. Swedish is described by a strong word stress (emphasis that may be given to certain syllables in a word, or certain words in a phrase or sentence) and phrase prosody ( is the rhythm, stress and speech intonation) that differs from English. When Swedish prosody is spoken in English language, it sound more melodic, and this is even more visible when Swedish stress patterns are used on English words, and became one of the most causes of Swenglish. Swedish lacks many common English phonemes, and are sometimes replaced by similar sound of Swedish phonemes, or other English phonemes which are more easy to pronounce. Some Swenglish examples are; actual- aktuell, ankle-ankel, answer-asvar, antique-antik, announce-annonsera, athlete-atlet and many more.

20) Hunglish or Hungarian English

Hunglish or Hungarian English (image credit:appfinder.lisisoft.com)

Hunglish or Hungarian English (image credit:appfinder.lisisoft.com)

Metis English Hungarian dictionary (image credit:www.brothersoft.com)

Metis English Hungarian dictionary (image credit:www.brothersoft.com)

Hungarian or Magyar, Hungarian name for the language, which is also occasionally used as an English word to refer to the Hungarian people  as an ethnic group, and a member of the Uralic languages that constitute a language family of about three dozen languages spoken by estimated 25 million people, and the principal language spoken by Hungarians. The Hungarian language is the official language of Hungary, and the most widely spoken language in Europe or non-Indo-European. Hungarian language, is one of the 24 official languages of the European Union, and also spoken by Hungarian communities in the seven neighboring Hungary countries,typically in Romania, Slovakia, Serbia and Ukraine and by diaspora communities in the world. Some controversy arose about the origins of the Hungarian language, and also made some attempts, but dismissed by mainstream linguists as pseudoscientific comparisons, showing that Hungarians is related to other foreign languages such as Hebrew, Hunnic, Sumerian, Egyptian, Etruscan, Basque, Persian, Pelasgians, Greek, Chinese, Sanskrit, English, Tibetan, Magar, Quechua, Armenian, Japanese and some 40 languages. Examples of Hungarian to English vocabulary; Formal, when addressing a stranger: Good day!Jó napot (kívánok)! ,  Informal, when addressing a close acquaintance: Szia!, Good-bye!: Viszontlátásra! (formal) Viszlát! (semi-informal), Szia! (informal) same stylistic remark as for “Hello!”,Excuse me: Elnézést!, How much?: Mennyi?, Thank you: Köszönöm, yes-igen, no-nem, Where’s the toilet?: Hol van a vécé?  (veːtse) is the Hungarian pronunciation of the English abbreviation of “Water Closet” or Hol van a mosdó? – a word for word and more polite version.

 

 

 

 

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