Strange and Amazing Thailand

Thailand is a kingdom, a constitutional monarchy with the 19th King of the House of Chakri, King Bhumibol Adulyadej, reigned since 1946. King Bhumibol Adulyadej, was the longest monarch in Thai history and world’s longest serving current head of state. Bangkok is the largest city in Thailand, and also the center of commercial, industrial, political and cultural activities in Thailand. Thailand is the 50th largest country in the world in terms of total area and heavily influence by the religious culture of India, Kingdom of Funan during the first century.

 

Bangkok, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

 

The Grand Palace, built in 1782 is the official resident of the King of Thailand.

 

Grand Palace in Bangkok, built in 1782 (Wilkipedia)

 

The Grand Palace in Bangkok is the official residence of the King of Thailand.

Bangkok’s Democracy Monument

 

Bangkok’s Democracy Monument built in 1932

 

The Bangkok Democarcy Monument was built in 1932, to represent the 1932 Constitution sits on top of two Golden Bowls Offering above the turrets.

Wat Arun, Temple of the Dawn

 

Wat Arun at Chao Phraya River (Wilkipedia)

 

The Wat Arun Temple of the dawn, is a Buddhist temple (Wat) in Bangkok, Yai District.

 

Wat Phra Kaew Complex of Emerald Buddha (Wilkipedia)

 

 

Wat Phra Sing Temple, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

 

Buddhist Temple in Chiang Mai, Thailand

Suvarnabhumi International Airport/ New Bangkok International Airport

 

Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

 

 

Suvarnabhumi International Airport, Bangkok, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Curn of the Milk Ocean Statue, Departure Area of Suvarnabhumi Airport (Wilkipedia)

 

 

Old Bangkok International Airport, Don Mueng, Bangkok (Credit image by: BangkokPicture.com)

 

Floating Markets, where you can buy fresh vegetables, fish, fruits and even dine-in with noodles, Thai soups and other dishes sold in a small boats.

 

Damnoen Saduak Floating Market in Ratchaburi District, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

 

 

Bang Khu Wiang Floating Market, Bangkok (wilkipedia)

 

 

Taling Chan Floating Market, Bangkok (Wilkipedia)

 

 

Tha Kha Floating Market in Bangkok (Wilkipedia)

Chatuchak one of the famous markets where tourists can shop cheaper items from bags, to ready-to-wear dress, accessories, and souvenir items.

Chatuchak Market, Bangkok (www.bangkok.com)

Chatuchak Narrow Soi’s Market, Bangkok (Wilkipedia)

Pak Khlong Talat Market, Flower Markets Bangkok (Wilkipedia)

Suam Lum Night Bazaar, Bangkok, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Thailand’s Baht Gold

 

N5000 Baht Gold Chain (thaibahtgold.com)

 

 

Ring/ RG_6005 23k glod (thaibahtgold.com)

 

 

Pendant/ PD_4003/ 23k gold (thaibahtgold.com)

 

The Thai Baht gold come in various designs and karats (16k,18k,21k,23k and 24k gold) and you can shop cheaper golds in Bangkok, but be sure you can’t purchase the “fake gold baht”.

Patpong District, is an entertainment district in Bangkok, Thailand.

Patpong District at Sunset in Bangkok, also known as Entertainment District (Wilkipedia)

Plastic Surgery Hospitals and Clinics are the most famous area in Thailand, where rich and famous celebrities go, for reconstruction surgeries, buttocks augmentation, breast augmentation, face lift and re-constructions, breast implants, liposuctions, etc, etc. But most famous here are the transsexual transplant male to female. Beautiful ladyboy or” Katoeys” Thailanders mostly had sex changed.

Katoeys in a Beauty Pageant in Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Nong Tum, Katoey Thai Boxer (Wilkipedia)

Parinya Kiatbusaba or Parinya Jaroenhon, born in June 9, 1981, now very famous by the name Nong Tum, a former champion of the Muai Thai Boxing, had his training as a Buddhist monk in his early age, but was already aware of his ‘identity crisis’ and his goal of becoming a famous boxer is for his poor family and his aim to have sex change someday. Nong Tum is now a model actress in Thailand.

Muay Thai Boxing

Muay Thai or Thai Boxing (Wilkipedia)

Thai Boxing or Muay Thai, a hard martial art practiced in some parts of the world.

Sepak Takraw, or Kikc Volleyball, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Sepak Takraw – Kick volleybal using ‘rattan ball’ and only allows the players using their feet, knee, chest and head.

Thailand artists, Kittiwat Unarrom, baked loaf of breads or homemade breads of ‘severed human head bread’ design that made him famous found at the “Serial Killer Basements” bakery shop in Bangkok, with his ‘death designs’.

Bread of Horror, Thailand (www.4to40.com)

Giant Cat Fish, caught in Northern Thailand in the Mekong River.

Giant Catfish in Northern Thailand (www.weirdasianews.com)

Strange Creature Found in Thailand (www.weirdasianews.com)

This strange creature was found by local people in Thailand. What makes it weird when people made offerings of powder and juices as tribute to this strange creature, and place ‘fans’ around the creature to preserve for scientists study purposes.

Exotic fruits found in Thailand

Durian Fruit (bloghotelclub.com)

Kumquiat Fruits (blog.hotelclub.com)

Dragon Fruit (blog.hotelclub.com)

Longan (Lahm-yai) (thailand.e-travel-to.com)

Lychee (blog.hotelclub.com)

Passion Fruits (blog.hotelclub.com)

Mangosteen Fruit (blog.hotelclub.com)

Rambutan Fruits (blog.hotelclub.com)

Rose Apple (Chomphu) (thailand.e-travel-to.com)

This exotic tropical fruits are so sweet and juicy.

Thai Dishes

Kaeng Phet Pet Yang (Roast Duck in Red Curry Stew (Wilkipedia)

Pad Thai in Bangkok (Wilkipedia)

Thai Seafood Cuisine (Wilkipedia)

Weird and Freaky Street Foods

Beetle’s Stew (www.funatiq.com)

Cicadas Barbecue (www.funatiq.com)

Centepede in skewers (www.funatiq.com)

Grilled Larvae or Crispy Maggots (www.funatiq.com)

Scorpions in a Skewers (www.funatiq.com)

These weird and freaky insects are most famous delicacy streetfood in Bangkok.

 

Wedding Traditions in Thailand

Marriage Ceremony in Thailand (blog.metrotribe.com)

Wai of Thai Bride in a Wedding Ceremony (Wilkipedia)

Wai is the Thai greeting way or say Thank you, the palms pressed together in a prayer-like fashion wait a slight bow of head. Very similar to Indian culture and traditions of greeting ‘namaste’ or the Cambodia “sampeah”. Also ued in saying sorry and thank you.

Ronald Mcdonald’s in Tahiland in Wai position (Wilkipedia)

Funeral Traditions

Funeral Rites Cremation in Thailand (Wilkipedia)

They usually cremate the dead relatives, unlike the common Chinese they bury the deceased. The urn of ashes are kept in the local “Chedi” Temple.

Phra Sri Chedi within Wat Phra Kaeo (Wilkipedia)

Weird and amazing festivals

Buffalo Racing Chonburi(Weirdnews.com)

Monkey Buffet Festival, Thailand (Weirdnews.com)

Rub Bua Festival in Bang Phli (weirdnews.com)

Songkran (Water Throwing Festival) New Year Celebration, Chiang Mai Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Vegetarian Festival Rituals (weirdnews.about.com)

These are only some of the unique festivals celebrated in Thailand.

Chalk Body Paint (Wilkpedia)

Songkaran Festival traditional covering face and body with chalks.

Tuk Tuk Taxi in Bangkok, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

Karen Hill Tribes in Thailand

Buddhist Karen Women Tribes, Kyaikkami Yele Pagoda (Wilkipedia)

Kayan Girl in Northern Karen Hill Tribe, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

At an early young age, the Kayan or Karen tribe girls, started to wear ring-coils in their neck, and as they grow older more rings are added each year.

Kayan Woman in Nrthern Thailand (Wilkipedia)

When this rings are removed, their neck will lost it’s support, their neck are weak without those rings coiled in their necks.

Snake Charmers Shows in Thailand

 

Thailand Cobra Charmer (orienttales.com)

 

 

Cobra Snake Charmer (orienttales.com)

 

 

Snake Charmer in Thailand (www.lifeinthefastlane.ca/)

 

Only professional snake charmers could do this act, which was introduced and practiced in India.

Pattaya Beach, one of the most beautiful beach resort in Thailand.

 

Pattaya Beach Resort, Thailand (thaitravel.com)

 

 

Chiang Mai, Thailand (thaitravel.com)

 

 

Full View of Wat Phra Kaew Complex, Thailand (Wilkipedia)

 

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